Welcome to the MetaAutomation Blog

What is MetaAutomation all about?

It’s about replacing the term “test automation” with something much more descriptive, proper, generative, and less misleading: quality automation. Quality automation describes a problem space, and the code that implements the automation in that space.

The quality automation problem space describes everything that automation can do to help a software team measure and report quality.

The “Meta” is about being intentional about your approach to quality automation code, to focus on what it is best at and maximum value to the business. If automation is just making a software product do stuff, then MetaAutomation is taking a complete high-level understanding of what quality automation is good at and applying it to ship software faster and at higher quality.

MetaAutomation is a pattern language that addresses the quality automation problem space, with a focus on developing and shipping software faster and at higher quality and trustworthiness.

The second coolest thing about MetaAutomation is that it uses a clear understanding — detailed in my book, and in this post — of how measuring product quality can’t just depend on finding bugs. Measuring product quality also depends on verifying correct behavior and doing it fast and often.

The absolute coolest thing about MetaAutomation is that there is huge business value made possible from a foundation of measuring product behavior in detail with an existing, ubiquitous pattern; this is the pattern that I discovered and call Hierarchical Steps. Hierarchical Steps is something all people do, and other animals as well. I address this here.

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